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Stockholm Design Week 2

Today I made it to the Furniture Fair, and wow I feel like I was run over by a train now… You see, I live in the countryside, and am not used to seeing that many people and things at the same time! Aside from that feeling it was a great experience! It felt like the fair had grown a lot from last year (actually it has, as they recently added 10 00 square meters to one of the halls), and there were many more interesting exhibitors this year. I could also sense a feeling of hope and enthusiasm in the air, like the regression is about to end soon and give room for more risktaking and edgy designs. Gotta love that!

It felt like the big trend in booth designs this year was using lots of white in combination with black and wood, and guess what I think of that?! Super, of course! If you have ever read this blog before, you can not have missed the fact that it’s my preferred colour range!

I would like to start by introducing 100% Norway. This was a big booth full of the best Norwegian design has to offer, with some of the biggest names represented as well as a few newcomers. The booth itself was shaped like a traditional drying rack used to dry fish in the Northern parts of Norway, and inside it were lots of beautiful furniture pieces, wallpaper and home accessories.

The 100% Norway booth

Basic, a collaboration between StokkeAustad and Frost Produkt.

The Glass series consisting of a water carafe, a wine decanter and an old-fashioned and red wine glass, is the result of a collaboration between StokkeAustad and Frost Produkt. The project was initiated after a common wish to create timeless durable tools for preparing, serving and enjoying food. In addition to the glass series kitchen utensils, cutting board, a trivet, and candleholders has also been designed.

We wanted to create sturdy durable and lasting objects; lasting both in quality of material, and through an abiding form. The carafe and decanter have a large opening for pouring water and wine into them, and big easily maneuvered cork. The large neck of the opening is also used as a handle. The glasses take after the carafe in their straight lines, angles, and slight cone. The glass series are made of glass and turned oak.

The series was awarded Best Cooks Kit, by Wallpaper Design award 2010.

Basic
Prototypes, 2009.
A collaboration between StokkeAustad and Frost Produkt.
The Glass series consisting of a water carafe, a wine decanter and an old-fashioned and red wine glass, is the result of a collaboration between StokkeAustad and Frost Produkt. The project was initiated after a common wish to create timeless durable tools for preparing, serving and enjoying food. In addition to the glass series kitchen utensils, cutting board, a trivet, and candleholders has also been designed.
We wanted to create sturdy durable and lasting objects; lasting both in quality of material, and through an abiding form. The carafe and decanter have a large opening for pouring water and wine into them, and big easily maneuvered cork. The large neck of the opening is also used as a handle. The glasses take after the carafe in their straight lines, angles, and slight cone. The glass series are made of glass and turned oak.
The series was awarded Best Cooks Kit, by Wallpaper Design award 2010.Basic, Prototypes, 2009. A collaboration between StokkeAustad and Frost Produkt.
Hay, sofa by Petter Skogstad

”Hay is a module-based sitting furniture inspired by bales of hay. Arrange the modules how ever you like and create a landscape. The modules are soft, playful and inviting.”

Norwegian Forest White, by Cathrine Kullberg

Norwegian Forest lights draw on a classic Scandinavian tradition of using thin wood veneer strips for lighting. Norwegian Forest lights show a deep pine forest with animals in light and shade.

The shade is made from thin double layered white stained ash, 1st grade. The veneer is carefully laser cut by a skilled airplane model maker who knows his veneer. The simple shape of the shade and the structure of the wood is challenged by the intricate pattern cut into it – made possible through a close relation to the material and a succession of test cuttings.

There is a long tradition in Scandinavian craft to use these thin strips of wood, and in the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s it was used for lighting. Now, the Norwegian Forest Lights represent a new take on tradition.
That’s all for now, more highlights from the fair is coming tomorrow!

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